Elizabeth Mescher is currently a senior at Lake Forest College in Lake Forest, Illinois. She is a double major in Sociology and Anthropology, and History with a minor in Art History. She started working on this project in 2013 and has been focusing on anti-adulthood in different generations. She explores the questions ranging from the importance of how the 1960s counter-culture established expectations for youth of subsequent generations to the circumstances and experiences of millennials who deviate from the label "adult". Elizabeth is pursuing a career in archaeology and does not yet believe she is an adult.

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Kids These Days…

Well in the midst of Adulthood madness of this August, I have been doing some research regarding my topic of anti-adulthood and the differences between the generations. Oh wait, there really aren’t any… When you were a kid, a teenager, or in your early twenties, did you ever hear older people say “kids these days”?

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Don’t let the guest towels fool you; we’re not our parents yet…

This week in The Adulthood Project I started a new book called Twenty Something: Why Do Young Adults Seem Stuck? by Robin Marantz Henig and her daughter Samantha Henig. Keeping the theme of “anti-adulthood” and the “Peter Pan” lifestyle, this book discusses why Millennials are stuck and looking into if this generation really is different than those of the past.

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Are you living the American Dream in your twenties?

This week in The Adulthood Project we went to The Chicago History Museum to look around in the research library. We found some really great advice columns from Ask Ann which were written in the late 50s. They showed some really great examples of how family life was back then and how that generation grew into

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Did you grow up in a gladiator school?

This week in The Adulthood Project… We had a really good start to the month! This week I set up a bunch of phone and in person interviews. Each member of the team will be interviewing someone about their experiences with adulthood and coming of age. After a few days of transcribing interviews, I think